MORE EVANGELICAL COLLABORATION WITH COUNCIL ON FOREIGN RELATIONS

IN FEBRUARY 2021 THE BIDEN ADMINISTRAITON RENEWED THE FAITH BASED PARTNERSHIPS FUNNELING FEDERAL DOLLARS TO CHRISTIAN MINISTRIES AND DENOMINATIONS. BY MAY 2021 LEADING EVANGELICALS WERE WORKING WITH FBP DIRECTOR AND THE GLOBALIST COUNCIL ON FOREIGN RELATIONS ON “RELIGIOUS COMMUNITIES ROLE IN” COVID MANAGMENT.

Rev Thomas Littleton

Revelations of continued collaboration by key evangelical leaders like Ed Stetzer with the Council on Foreign Relations have been unsettling confirmation on what some have been warning about for decades. The once biblically conservative evangelical church cannot blindly follow their leaders unless they wish to be delivered into the hands of anti-Christ global forces, groomed into “useful idiots” and trafficked as the volunteer workforce of the future.

https://www.cfr.org/event/religion-communitys-role-managing-covid

“The Religion Community’s Role in Managing COVID-19”

Wednesday, May 19, 2021

Speakers

Jacqueline J. Lewis

Senior Minister for Public Theology and Transformation, Middle Collegiate Church

Melissa Rogers

Executive Director, Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships, White HousePresider

Walter Kim

President, National Association of Evangelicals

THE HEAD OF THE NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF EVANGLEICALS IS MODERATING THE CFR EVENT

Religion and Foreign Policy Workshop

“KIM:Thank you. Greetings, I’m Walter Kim, president of the National Association of Evangelicals, an organization that connects forty denominations and scores of Christian institutions and ministry. I’m delighted to be part of this conversation on the religion community’s role in managing COVID-19. And along with me, as conversation partners, are Reverend Jacqui Lewis, senior minister for public theology and transformation at Middle Church in New York City. She is an author and activist preacher, public theologian, working particularly in the areas of racial justice, but also seeing the church as a place for social transformation. And with us, also is Melissa Rogers, executive director at the White House Office of Faith-Based and Neighborhood Partnerships. A role that she held previously with distinction and now has renewed. Melissa is not only an expert on religion in America, but she is also supremely capable leader to bring together people from various segments of society to address our country’s greatest needs and possibilities. So, Jacqui, Melissa, thank you for joining in this conversation.”

“ROGERS AND LEWIS: Delighted to be here. Thank you.”

THE ROLE OF FAITH BASED PARTNERSHIPS IN SEDUCTION OF THE CHURCH

MELISSA ROGERS

“One of the things I’ve mentioned is the Equity Task Force that the Biden administration has put in place along with the COVID response team. And I think that leadership and leadership in the faith community in particular in this area has launched a new conversation. And that has been all to the good.”

THE FOCUS ON INTERFAITH WORK IN THE FBP

LEWIS:

“Thank you, Melissa, for those reflections. I wanted to dovetail into this idea of resilience and maybe even to put resistance in that. I think faith communities across denominations and across Jews, Muslims, Buddhists, Sikhs, Christians, I think I’ve seen my colleagues across the nation really show the ways love, revolutionary love, has no bounds.”

BOASTING ABOUT THE 2020 THE ELECTIONS

“So I think there was, again, across the nation across denominations, ways that faith leaders found to tap into creativity, to art, to community organizing, to protesting, to voter reform—look what we did in the elections during COVID. The way that we organized ourselves to learn issues, to share, to share resources, the Poor People’s Campaign, Vote Common Good, just some of the allies that we work with. “

(NOTE: Vote Common Good- is one of the radical progressive efforts to move Christians left in their voting in order to ensure a defeat of President Donald Trump in 2020.It was headed by Emergent Doug Pagitt whos radical funding and associations have been exposed on Worldview Weekend broadcast as well as this website.)

RACE AND INTERSECTIONALITY WERE THEIR ALLIES

“We had a tough year, not just with COVID, but the George Floyd murder, Ahmaud Arbery, Breonna Taylor, all of these moments of kind of racial crisis, the rising violence against Asian communities. We also, as faith communities, resisted oppression, resisted violence, and resisted racism, and actually bound ourselves, I think, together in an interfaith and multi-ethnic, multi-gendered movement for justice. And so I’m really proud of that.”

SHAMING FAITH LEADERS WHO DOUBTED THE PANDEMIC RESPONSE

“And I would say maybe one more thing, not to be polemic, but to say, in some places, faith pretended that the pandemic wasn’t real, okay. In some places, faith-based leaders gave their folks a sense that wearing a mask or distancing from one another was against faith, that if God was real and good that we wouldn’t have to do that. And I struggled to understand that, I just want to make sure I say that out loud, to understand how responsible we are, for the ways our congregants take in information through the lens of faith leaders who they trust, and how powerful that is, right? And how important it is that we steward that power well.”

BACK TO KIM CELEBRATING THE THEOLOGY OF PANDEMIC MEDICINE

KIM:

“I’ve heard words—resilience, resistance, engagement, creativity. And I sense that the work of the NAE  face very similar issues. And, we’ve been seeking to engage in a few different ways. One is to inform. And so very early on, getting information out there, not only about the nature of this virus, but also about responses and—Jacqui, to your point, getting good information that puts it, not only in medical terms, but also in theological terms—medicine as a gift from God, the kind of creativity that was required to engage with worship service that both of you have mentioned, and in some ways, this has been a remarkable moment of entrepreneurial spirit within churches, spirit-led creativity that I would wish to highlight. But it’s been complicated, right?”

KIM PLAYS THE ASIAN RACE CARD BECAUSE OF WUHAN ORIGINS OF THE VIRUS

NOTE THE SOCIAL AND RACIAL JUSTICE SCRIPT

“And so, we’ve not only had to inform, but we’ve had to collaborate on a variety of issues, not only the medical issues, but the racial justice issues, and certainly as an Asian-American, I sense deeply the recent turns that really are revelation of long standing issues, that perhaps in the Asian-American, Pacific Islander community have been more silently endured.”

“NAE that we’ve been seeking to do is engagement, of actually participating, not just talking and building alliances, and developing this sense of solidarity, but engaging and becoming vaccinations sites at churches, or engaging with advocacy issues that deal with Black and Brown communities that have been disproportionately impacted. So, I sense, along with you, both this creative moment, but also challenging moment. And now I want to dive more specifically in why and how religious communities are particularly important to our national response to COVID. And by COVID, I’m not just meaning the virus, physical virus, but I mean, this whole last year and what has been revealed in our social settings. “

LEWIS GOES TOTALLY OFF THE GRID IN RACIAL CLAIMS WITH COVID

” And there’s this way in which what COVID showed us all is Black and Brown people die first—are most devastated. In fact, whole generations of Latinx, Hispanic men are actually lost to COVID. The ones who are on the frontlines, the one who are in the bodega jobs, the ones who drive the taxis, the ones who drive the Ubers.”

THE CHURCH IS CHARGED WITH ECONOMIC JUSTICE

“So there’s an economic reality that faith communities can help people understand—that our economy, if our economy is going to be God’s economy, how do we think about paying people more who work less? How do we—who work in these frontline jobs? How do we think about paid leave for moms and dads? How do we think about a living wage? How do we think about giving, making sure that everybody has healthcare? All those economic issues show themselves to us. Along with, again, the racial issues show themselves to us. We found out that we’ve not overcome, we’ve not overcome the way caste and race cause us to oppress one another. And I think those of us who do theology have an urgent responsibility to teach our congregants, to teach our faith leaders, the oneness of God, the many languages God speaks, the value that God has on all human life. The way that we are one people called to one, one hope, one ethic, and I think that we not only have a responsibility, we have an urgent calling, to make sure that these theologies of welcome, these theologies of love and justice become like air we breathe, and not so much caught in creed, and culture.”

MELISSA ROGERS JOB -ENGAGE THE FAITH COMMUNITIES IN BIDEN ADMINS AGENDA

KIM:

“Melissa, your job is to get faith communities engaged. So I imagine you have a lot of why’s and how’s.”

ROGERS:

“There are some why’s and how’s, yes. One of the things that I think has become even more clear during this period, is that because of the role that faith plays in our country, religious leaders and faith-based organizations are vital to public health. And you don’t have to be a person of faith necessarily to see that, and let me just talk through one example. When we were thinking about early on getting facts to people about the virus and the vaccination, and you reference this, Walter, and also Jacqui as well, we knew that working with faith communities was going to be essential. It wasn’t a choice. It was something that had to happen in order to effectively meet people across the country and around the world. And some of the reasons for that are just very factual. Houses of worship are pervasive, and they’re familiar to many Americans. Religious leaders are among the most trusted figures in our communities, and vast majority of religious leaders are enthusiastic about helping, and one of the great bright spots of this has been that, for the most part, this has brought faith communities together, and saying, we can work on this together,”

“SEEING TRUSTED FAITH LEADERS GET THE VACCINE” HELPFUL IN BUILDING TRUST

MELISSA

“This love your neighbor moment has brought us together. We know that people have fears and anxieties, questions that need to be answered. And we know that when they see someone they trust getting the vaccine, talking about the facts here, that that can really change their willingness to get the vaccine. And that matters a lot.”

FAITH COMMUNITIES KEY TO HEALTHCARE /COVID JUSTICE / HEALTH EQUITY

“We also know that many faith groups are exceptionally good at reaching underserved communities. And that matters a great deal. We also know that houses of worship are often gap fillers for a lack of culturally-sensitive healthcare. They help people you know with language barriers or with information barriers or other kinds of access barriers, for example, many minority groups and immigrants. And so it’s just shot into the public recognition, I think, that faith communities are absolutely central to public health, including to this virus but not limited to this virus”….. because we’ll face other challenges in the future and we want to make sure we’re ready. So one thing I’m really grateful for is that President Biden has understood this from the very beginning. And he was very clear that we should be working with faith communities of all kinds, and indeed, has himself visited pop-up vaccination clinics at a chapel recently, and has always taken a great interest in this. So it’s a great moment, I think, to think about how the government works with faith communities in a way that respects church-state separation, and religious liberty for everyone, and partners on shared goals, and make sure that no one is left behind.”

KIM ADDRESSES THE ONGOING CHALLENGE OF VACCINATIONS

KIM:

“There’s a tremendous kind of collaborative spirit that’s developed as a result of this challenge. And, of course, there are moments of fragmentation, we are human. And despite the call to shared humanity, there is a streak of obstinance in all humans. But, by and large, I have entered into all sorts of conversations I don’t think I would have had otherwise. Tomorrow night, I’ll be with bBlackdoctors.org, in a collaborative event, a multi-racial approach to this challenge of vaccination. “

“And these are relationships and partnerships, these are collaborations that maybe would not have existed. But the new kinds of friendships that develop from this, hold a promise far beyond this pandemic. They are friendships, they are relationships, that could be leveraged for other sorts of social challenges in the future, that the faith community could be using this as an occasion, not just to solve a problem of this past year, but to engage with problems in the coming years that beset us. “

KIM CONFIRMS THE NAE WORK WTH AD COUNCIL /COVID COLLABORATIVE

“So at the NAE we collaborated with the Ad Council and faith leaders in Black and Brown communities to produce ads that the NAE—we could not have produced. But the Ad Council, that’s their job, that’s their expertise, and to be able to use that in the collaborative effort to get information out, but distributed in these trusted places. Both of you talked about the church as being this trusted, localized, trusted place. And these are very powerful issues, because, you know, if we’re going to address issues of racial justice, yes, they’ll be national conversations, but they’re going to be localized efforts that need to move the needle for change, the conversations on the local level. So this has been very heartening for us to broach these opportunities together.”

MELISSA ROGERS TOUTS THE BIDEN ADMINS PUSH FOR FBP ACTIONS

ROGERS:

“Okay. Sure. Yeah, well, so this week has been a landmark week, as the President announced more than 60 percent of people eighteen years and older have received at least one dose of the vaccination. Cases have continued to decrease, hospital admissions are down, deaths, thank God, are down, and we’re vaccinating between about 1.5 to 2 million people per day. So I think we are winning the war against the virus, but the battle is not done. There is an incredible amount of work ahead of us, particularly this summer. The President has set a goal that 70 percent of the country’s adults will have at least one vaccination shot by July 4, and 160 million Americans will be fully vaccinated by July 4. And in that regard, I’d just like to mention, if I could, several things that, and I know I’m preaching to the choir here, but I hope that we can all redouble our efforts this summer and just want to mention a few resources that you can take advantage of, some of which are new. One is vaccines.gov, to help people find a location near them where they can be vaccinated. They can also text their zip code to 438829, that’s 4388292, to find a vaccination near them. There’s an 800 number that they can call. And also, we’re having a Digital Day of Action this Friday, May 21.”

KIM SPEAKS OF BREAKING BREAD AS A COVID CORPS MEMBER PASTOR

” Speaking as not only president of the NEA, but as a local pastor, reengagement of all that church represents. The breaking of bread together, the studying of the Bible in small groups, the being on mission in our neighborhoods, sending short-term mission teams overseas in different contexts to help out, I mean all the myriads of ways that the church represents an opportunity of service. And this is true of other faith traditions as well. And it’s in part why I joined with the COVID Community Corps and recently put out a Trusted Voices video with the Department of Health and Human Services that followed me around as I got my second vaccination shot, and one of the most compelling things about that second vaccination shot for me was to see the people gathered there.”

KIIM/NAE VISION OF “WHAT AMERICA COULD BE”

KIM:

“I mean, men, women, old, young, racial diversity, ethnic diversity represented in the line as I was standing, waiting to get my shot. And it really was the sense that we can do this. And we are doing this. And it really does take everyone. And that’s a very compelling vision of what America could be. And in its better moments, really is, but we need to continue to persist in this. “

CONCLUSION

For 18 months this writer and a few others like Brannon Howse have warned that very influential evangelical leaders were aligning the church with globalist in the pandemic. No doubt the church should play a role in relieving suffering and grief but not as partners with government funding in Faith Based Partnerships with the Biden administration or with Council on Foreign Relations view of “What America could be” since their global dreams began in 1921.

Evangelicals like Ed Stetzer and Russell Moore (who has worked very closely with Kim and the NAE with the Ad Council /Facebook for Faith) have lost sight of their own vision and calling if they ever had it. God has never called on the church or it’s leaders to be partnered with the very forces seeking to destroy it’s influence and ability to bring the Gospel and REAL HOPE to the dying .Eternity is the vision most needed by those who faithfully serve the living God. Not the Faith Based Partnership justice and equity gospel nor the Council on Foreign Relations anti-Christ, enslavement vision honed over the last century.

Nothing could be farther from the work of God than these godless agendas. The deception at this level is well beyond ignorance. It is demonic.

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